Autism and Auditory Hypersensitivity: Causes and Treatment

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A recent report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services indicates that autism spectrum disorder prevalence has significantly increased to over 2% of all children in the United States, with an estimated 1 in 28 boys currently with an autism diagnosis.

Professionals working with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may find that these children are overly sensitive to sounds. These professionals and parents are often concerned as to why children may have auditory hypersensitivities.

The journal Autism Research and Treatment recently published a peer reviewed article which discusses the neural mechanisms identified underlying hypersensitive hearing in people. I wrote this article with Dr. Jay R. Lucker of Howard University. Our article focuses on brain research to support the idea of the non-classical auditory pathways being involved in connecting the auditory system with the emotional system of the brain. We also discuss brain mechanisms believed to be involved in auditory hypersensitivity, and treatments for hypersensitive hearing.

This Wednesday, February 3rd at 8 pm Eastern, Dr. Jay R. Lucker will join me on The Listening Program Radio to discuss the topic of Autism and Auditory Hypersensitivity, the causes, treatment, and hope for those suffering from sound sensitivities.

Register here for this free program and to ask us a question we can answer live. You’ll receive an email with the call-in number and a web link to listen online 3 hours before the show.

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Autism and Auditory Hypersensitivity: Hope for Relief

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Helping individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) achieve their greatest potential has been something close to my heart throughout my career. This interest has lead me in many directions including; research, developing scientifically optimized music for brain training, conference presentations, board positions in autism organizations, and writing.

One of my questions has been why do people with ASD so frequently demonstrate behaviors related to sensory over responsitivity (SOR), specifically auditory  hypersensitivity, also called hyperacousis and misophonia? This is a condition that touches not just the majority of individuals with autism, but many others including the so-called “neurotypical”. Sound hypersensitivity can be absolutely debilitating. It is heart-wrenching to see a child or adult suffer pain or perception of pain from everyday sounds.

In the quest to help, I’ve been so fortunate that Dr. Jay R. Lucker of the Department of Communication Sciences at Howard University and I share this interest. For years we have collaborated on research related to this phenomenon. Our first joint article on the topic “Auditory Hypersensitivity and Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Emotional Response” was published in Autism Science Digest in 2012. We then wrote an extensive follow-up to the Autism Science Digest article which is a deeper exploration into the neural mechanisms involved in auditory hypersensitivity which was just published in the peer reviewed journal Autism Research and Treatment.

Abstract

Professionals working with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may find that these children are overly sensitive to sounds. These professionals are often concerned as to why children may have auditory hypersensitivities. This review article discusses the neural mechanisms identified underlying hypersensitive hearing in people. The authors focus on brain research to support the idea of the nonclassical auditory pathways being involved in connecting the auditory system with the emotional system of the brain. The authors also discuss brain mechanisms felt to be involved in auditory hypersensitivity. The authors conclude with a discussion of some treatments for hypersensitive hearing. These treatments include desensitization training and the use of listening therapies such as The Listening Program.

If you are a parent of a child with autism, caregiver, educator, or therapist who is touched by someone with autism, or you yourself are on the autism spectrum I do hope this latest research article provides some answers, and hope for relief from over sensitivity to sounds.

 

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The Naked Voice: Transform Your Life Through the Power of Sound

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One of the great benefits of my friendship with the late Don Campbell, besides co-authoring Healing at the Speed of Sound® together, are the wonderful people I have met through him. Among them is the lovely Chloë Goodchild, a radiant international singer, innovative educator, and now author whose new book The Naked Voice I will share a little bit about now.

Both science and spirituality agree that every particle of matter, every phenomenon we experience, is a form of resonance or vibration. The human voice is quite literally a mouthpiece of this truth; there is no form of expression more personal, more tied to our identities, than our voices.

In her book, The Naked Voice Chloë Goodchild gives readers the tools to guide them in a process of sound healing and soul communication that is guaranteed to open the heart and restore forgiveness, compassion, and interconnectedness between individuals and in their communities. At the heart of every human journey exists the longing to feel at home in one’s self and in the world.

This Wednesday, January 6th at 8 pm Eastern Chloë will join me on The Listening Program Radio as my first guest of 2016. Join us as we discuss her book and the essential components of The Naked Voice. 

Register here for an email reminder and to ask Chloe a question we can answer during the program.

 

 

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Neurotechnology – The Resilience, Performance, and Rehabilitation Solution for Military, Veterans, and Their Families

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Over the past decade, the first treatment response for the U.S. military and veteran epidemic of sleep disorders, traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress, mental health, and suicide prevention has been pharmaceuticals which are ineffective and have long-lasting negative side effects.

At present, the suicide rate among veterans is 23 lives a day; sleep disorders among active duty is above 54%, and the most common pharmaceuticals used for mental health and sleep disorders are both highly addictive and proven to do permanent harm.

The only effective, drug-free solutions to address all of these life-debilitating physiological and psychological issues, are non-invasive neurotechnologies.

U.S. military veteran, tactical, defense and performance expert, and motivational speaker Fara Eve Barnes, founder of  Valor Performance Research & Helm Performance Training is on a mission to rapidly implement neurotechnology solutions for defense and tactical applications within the defense, military, veteran, and law enforcement populations.

Join me and his my  guest Fara Eve Barnes on TLP Radio as we discuss the role of neurotechnology in defense and tactical applications for resilience, performance and rehabilitation including:

  • implementing an advanced training model beyond the current elite mental and physical strength and extreme endurance paradigm.
  • accelerated learning for advanced skills training.
  • real-time evaluation and improvement of individual and team tactical performance, leadership, and deadly force decision making (DFDM).
  • resilience against and recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI), post-traumatic stress (PTS), sleep disorders, suicide, and more.
  • non-pharmaceutical solutions offering military and their families, and veterans mobile neurotechnology hardware, software and apps with customized training and personalized programs to use in the convenience of their home or work, out in the field, and down range for optimal resilience, performance, and recovery.

When? Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 8PM Eastern. Register here for this live, free podcast.

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Doing and Being: Rediscovering Creativity in Life, Love, and Work

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Several years ago I had the good fortune of meeting one of the brightest, most creative individuals I’ve ever crossed paths with, award-winning film producer and creativity expert, Barnet Bain.

I had been acquainted with his work through the powerful Oscar winning film What Dreams May Come starring Robin Williams, which Barnet produced. It was a bit surreal sitting  at a dinner table for hours with Barnet, his lovely wife Sandi, and other brilliant friends at The Ivy in Santa Monica. The evening was spontaneous and  very reminiscent of a dinner scene in Steve Martin’s LA Story. What impressed me most was Barnet’s inquisitive nature, his deep interest in the brain, and how to tap it’s potential to help people realize their dreams.

Fast forward to 2015 and I’ve just finished The Book of Doing and Being, Barnet’s new self-help book. And I must say it is really superb!

With clarity, humor, and insight, award-winning filmmaker Barnet Bain guides readers to unlock the raw power of the creative self. Sharing creativity principles and practices at the leading edge, The Book of Doing and Being offers a life-altering map for stepping beyond what we already know and into a dimension of imagination from which innovation is born.

Known for his inspiring movies and documentaries, as well as his popular creativity workshops, Barnet Bain makes available his teachings for the first time in book form. Discover how will and action come together with imagination and feeling to form the very foundation of creativity by working with this treasury of more than forty transformative exercises. Each one is designed to spark new creative connections by challenging our usual ways of thinking, feeling, and perceiving.

These lessons, tools, and techniques serve to unlock great reservoirs of creativity in every individual, whether it’s jumpstarting or completing a project, launching a new business, creating a work of art, experiencing more fulfilling relationships, or making other dreams come true. Bain’s motivational guidance includes: rewiring your brain to unleash ultra-creativity; finding freedom from self-criticism, perfectionism, and other obstructions to productivity and creative expression; harnessing the two forces of creativity: inspiration and action; discovering your emotions as the doorway to creative aliveness and ingenuity; and heeding the call of your Real Work, regardless of age, education, or experience.

Step by step, you will make the discovery of a lifetime: how to stop being ruled by your past and start consciously creating your present and future. You will be surprised and energized—by your next creative impulse, the next idea that excites you, the next experience that moves you—and you will live a creative life.

Join me and my guest Barnet Bain as we discuss his new book Doing and Being.

When? Wednesday, September 9th at 8PM Eastern. Register here for this live, free podcast

NOTE: This show was originally scheduled for September 2nd and has been rescheduled due to a scheduling conflict. Please join us on September 9th for Doing and Being on TLP Radio.

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Can Structure and Creativity Coexist?

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Innovation surrounds us, and we can each be engaged in creative expression within organizations, bolstered by rather than being crushed by structure and systems. Being given the freedom to ideate, try new ideas, and fail within a safe and flexible system fosters an environment built for innovation. People will unleash their creativity when empowered to do so.

Can structure and creativity coexist? Workfront asked me and 10 marketing thought leaders this question.  See what I say…  Can Structure and Creativity Coexist?

And, check out Chris Brogan, Rachel Herrscher, Ted Rubin and the others thoughts on this on Slideshare.

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Music Does Profound Things to Your Brain

My friend Max Lugavere joined us in Utah this past weekend to speak about brain health and his film BREADHEAD at The Listening Program® Conference 2015. We had a few minutes to film a quick chat about the power of music to change your brain. In the interview I introduce Max to inTime and our Waves multisensory headphone system where he experiences bone conducted listening for the first time. I loved his reaction! And be sure to listen to podcast we did on The Listening Program Radio & Podcast a while back.

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