Which brain areas are involved in music listening?

One of the more common questions we field about The Listening Program® (TLP) is “which brain areas are involved in music listening? I thought I’d take the opportunity to explore this a bit with you here at The Brain Understanding Itself.

The brain is musical; neuroscience has proven through functional brain imaging that when we listen to music, virtually the whole brain is involved.

Music listening not only involves the auditory areas of the brain, but also engages large-scale neural networks including; prefrontal cortex, motor cortex, sensory cortex, auditory cortex, visual cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens, corpus callosum, autonomic nervous system, vestibular system, and the enteric nervous system.

TLP helps conduct the neural symphony, connecting the most ancient parts of the brain to the most advanced.

If you are not already familiar with TLP it is an easy, pleasurable and effective method to improve your brain health and performance.  Here’s a great video with clients and professionals who have made  listening a daily practice to help with brain injury recovery, autism, reading, learning, attention, peak performance, wellness and more.

Areas of brain focus The Listening Program is designed to challenge and advance: 

Executive Function
Executive function is an umbrella term for a set of high-level mental processes that control and regulate other abilities and behaviors. They include the ability to initiate and stop actions, to monitor and change behavior as needed, and to plan future behavior when faced with novel asks and situations. Executive functions allow us to anticipate outcomes and adapt to changing situations.

Examples: attention, memory, behavior, organization, time management, self control

Communication
Communication is your ability to exchange information, thoughts, and opinions through verbal and written expression including speech, language, voice and writing; as well as non verbal expression such as gesture, facial expressions, and body language.

Examples: verbal comprehension, oral & written communication, voice quality, reading comprehension, understood by others, understanding body language

Auditory Processing
Auditory processing is your ability to understand and make sense of what you hear. Difficulty processing auditory information can have a negative impact on learning, thinking, communication and relationships.

Examples: listening, following verbal directions, focusing with background noise, comfort with sound, understanding tone of voice, sound discrimination

Social & Emotional
Your ability to relate to others, manage emotions, resolve conflicts, understand and respond to social situations is impacted by your social skills and emotional intelligence.

Examples: self-confidence, compassion, social interactions, interpersonal relationships, mood regulation, conflict resolution

Stress Response
Your body and brain is hard-wired to react to stress to protect you against threats, whether real or imagined. But, if your mind and body are constantly on edge because of excessive stress in your life, you may face serious health problems. That’s because your body’s “fight-or-flight reaction” — its natural alarm system — is constantly on.

Examples: stress reduction, relaxation, less overwhelmed, lower tension, better sleep, reduce nervous habits

Motor Coordination
Motor coordination is the harmonious functioning of body parts that involve movement including: gross motor skills such as walking, skipping, running and throwing; fine motor movement such as handwriting, buttoning a shirt, and keyboarding; and motor planning, the ability of the brain to conceive, organize and carry out purposeful movements.

Examples: balance, body awareness, coordination, fine motor skills, gross motor skills, activity level

Creative Expression
Your ability to express yourself creatively involves original & open thinking, imagination, problem solving, and movement to create something new and/or respond to opportunities.

Examples: musicality, opening thinking, visual arts, creative writing, innovation, problem solving

Based on sound science, The Listening Program® music trains the brain to improve how you perceive, process and respond to the flood of sensory information in our environment today. This leads to personal growth helping you to live a happier, productive, and more fulfilling life.

To learn more please free to visit http://advancedbrain.com or give us a call at +1.801.622.5676

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